Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Bush vs. Gore - fuggetaboudit?

According to Adam Cohen in the New York Times (rego required or use Bugmenot) seminars on the Rehnquist Court are avoiding discussion of perhaps its most historic case. Cohen argues that Bush vs Gore was right in law but wrong in remedy, and that Democratic petitioners attempting to use Bush vs Gore to ensure electoral fairness are winning in lower courts but being reversed when the cases are heard en banc at the District Courts of Appeal.
There are several problems with trying to airbrush Bush v. Gore from the law. It undermines the courts’ legitimacy when they depart sharply from the rules of precedent, and it gives support to those who have said that Bush v. Gore was not a legal decision but a raw assertion of power.

The courts should also stand by Bush v. Gore’s equal protection analysis for the simple reason that it was right (even if the remedy of stopping the recount was not). Elections that systematically make it less likely that some voters will get to cast a vote that is counted are a denial of equal protection of the law. The conservative justices may have been able to see this unfairness only when they looked at the problem from Mr. Bush’s perspective, but it is just as true when the N.A.A.C.P. and groups like it raise the objection.

There is a final reason Bush v. Gore should survive. In deciding cases, courts should be attentive not only to the Constitution and other laws, but to whether they are acting in ways that promote an overall sense of justice. The Supreme Court’s highly partisan resolution of the 2000 election was a severe blow to American democracy, and to the court’s own standing. The courts could start to undo the damage by deciding that, rather than disappearing down the memory hole, Bush v. Gore will stand for the principle that elections need to be as fair as we can possibly make them.
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